more from Zweig

 

From: Deborah
Date: Sat Apr 3, 2004 6:25 am
Subject: more from Zweig

Stefan Zweig. The World of Yesterday. Lincoln, Ne.: University of Nebraska Press, 1964. Originally published by Viking, 1943.

from page 115 (during Zweig's time in Berlin, supposedly attending university, but according to his own account he never appeared at any lectures)

"...for the first time since Theodor Herzl I approached a man to whom destiny had given the mission of guiding millions of people. Personally he was not so much of a leader as Herzl had been, but he was more engaging. A hypnotic power lay in his dark eyes and I listened to him better and more critically when not looking at him, for his ascetic, thin face, carved by spiritual suffering, was well disposed to be convincing -- and not only to women. At that time Rudolf Steiner had not yet formulated his theories, he was still seeking and learning. On occasion he recited for us commentaries on the color-theories of Goethe, whose portrait, as he drew it, became more Faustian, more Paracelsian. It was exciting to listen to him, for his education was stupendous and quite different from our own, which was confined to literature alone. I always returned home from his lectures, and from many good, private conversations, both enraptured and somewhat depressed. However, if I ask myself today whether I would have foretold for that young man his great philosophical and ethical effect upon the masses, I must admit, to my shame, that I would not. I had expected great things from his questing intellect, and I would not have been in the least astonished to hear of some important biological discovery which his intuitive spirit had accomplished; but when many years later I saw the grandiose Goetheanum in Dornach, this "school of wisdom" which his pupils had founded as a platonic academy of anthroposophy, I was rather disappointed that his power had run to material and sometimes even into the commonplace. I do not claim any judgment of anthroposophy, for even today I am not quite clear as to what it seeks or means, and I believe that on the whole its seductive power is bound up not with an idea, but with the fascinating personality of Rudolf Steiner. Nevertheless, meeting a man of such a magnetic personality at so early a stage, when he yielded himself to the younger people around him in friendship and without dogmatizing, was an incalculable gain for me. In his fantastic and at the same time profound knowledge I realized that true universality, which we, with the overweening pride of high school boys, thought we had already mastered, was not to be gained by flighty reading and discussion, but only by years of burning endeavor."

Some biographical info on Stefan Zweig:

Who's Who in the Twentieth Century
Zweig, Stefan (1881-1942) Austrian biographer, essayist, and playwright. Born in Vienna into a well-to-do Jewish family, Zweig studied at the universities of Berlin and Vienna, travelled extensively, and during his lifetime cultivated a wide friendship with fellow artists and intellectuals (including Gorki, Rilke, Romain Rolland, Rodin, Toscanini, Freud, and Richard Strauss). He served in World War I and emerged from it a pacifist. Between the wars he lived mainly in Salzburg; in 1934 he went into exile, living briefly in England and New York before moving to Brazil. A humanist, Zweig lived long enough to see the world he knew utterly destroyed. In despair he and his wife committed suicide near Rio de Janeiro in 1942.

Zweig's writing covers a wide range of genres. His early work includes translations of Verlaine, Baudelaire, and Émile Verhaeren and collections of his own romantic poetry (1901, 1906), which was indebted to von Hofmannsthal. The influence of Freud's work can be seen in his short-story collections: Erstes Erlebnis (1911), Amok (1922), and Verwirrung (1927; translated as Conflicts, 1927). He wrote several plays, the earliest, an antiwar play entitled Jeremias (1917), while still in uniform. He translated Jonson's Volpone (1925) and Epicoene ( Die schweigsame Frau, 1935, which provided the libretto of the opera by Richard Strauss). His main work of fiction and also his last creative work was Schachnovelle (1942; translated as The Royal Game), in which the chess game is a metaphor for the disintegration of an intellectual being interrogated by the Gestapo.

But Zweig's reputation finally rests on his biographical essays and full-length biographies, which are among the best literary examples of Freud's influence, especially in penetrating the workings of the creative process. The shorter essays, first published in groups, were collected as Die Baumeister der Welt (1934; translated as Master Builders, 1939) and include the lives of Balzac, Dickens, Dostoievsky, Hölderlin, Kleist, Nietzsche, Casanova, Stendhal, and Tolstoy. His longer biographies are Romain Rolland (1921), Marie Antoinette (1932), Maria Stuart (1935), and, perhaps his greatest, Triumph und Tragik des Erasmus von Rotterdam (1935; translated as Right to Heresy, 1951). A book of 'historical miniatures`, Sternstunden der Menschheit (1927; translated as The Tide of Fortune, 1955), is concerned with moments that changed history. His autobiography, Die Welt von Gestern (1942; translated as The World of Yesterday, 1943), focuses on Europe before World War I.

How to cite this entry:
"Zweig, Stefan" Who's Who in the Twentieth Century. Oxford University Press, 1999. Oxford Reference Online. Oxford University Press. McGill University (Nylink). 3 April 2004
<
http://www.oxfordreference.com/views/ENTRY.html?subview=Main&entry=t47.e1758>

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From: holderlin66
Date: Sat Apr 3, 2004 4:18 pm
Subject: Re: more from Zweig

Deborah

A humanist, Zweig lived long enough to see the world he knew utterly destroyed. In despair he and his wife committed suicide near Rio de Janeiro in 1942.

Zweig:

Nevertheless, meeting a man of such a magnetic personality at so early a stage, when he yielded himself to the younger people around him in friendship and without dogmatizing, was an incalculable gain for me. In his fantastic and at the same time profound knowledge I realized that true universality, which we, with the overweening pride of high school boys, thought we had already mastered, was not to be gained by flighty reading and discussion, but only by years of burning endeavor."

Bradford comments;

What do we see and what details do we pick up when someone offers such a profound insight, as Deborah did? On one hand most of us are profound humanists. Most of us have entered Post Modern and Politically Correct Ideas that have changed since Steiner's days. 19th century ideas that Peter Staudenmaier is still embraces. Most of us are working on digesting the century difference of language and insight that has wrought Civil Rights and Ghandi's work, Woodstock, as well as thousands of other voices raised for the progress of terminology from the early Michael School depictions. Most of us have encountered directly full blown Racism.

But we also see a very sad, not exactly for me a romantic, ending to the above souls who met Rudolf Steiner and underestimated him. We have heard of the Ahasver experience. Peter Staudenmaier often spouts his ignorance of the Ahasver experience, which he knows nothing of how deep this was meant.

The Ahasver experience is the one where either Christ or a great Initiate speaks some truth and for a time, certain souls continue to ever and again reject that truth no matter how it is spoken. Who does it hurt? It certainly doesn't hurt the Christ or the Initiate, except that each individual human being carries a piece and fragment of the great puzzle of creation and cannot be excluded. It hurts Peter Staudenmaier more than it hurts Steiner.

Where under real experience would Diana get the idea that those connected to the Michael School support anything to do with racism or that they cannot distinguish a justification for aspects of Political Correct behavior? What could prompt Diana to think that the rest of us haven't shared in the very generations ideas that she has? Next;

When Diana says, even the children know the difference, and places, what every lazy and ill served parent does, places the adult maturity of insight against the child and places the child as loftier in maturity than conscious human insight, it is a subtle negating betrayal. It is bad, bad Parenting, yet all of us have witnessed that Children come in wiser and leave stupider. Why?

It is not because as young adults they balk at entering into deep waters like the coward that Diana confesses to be. Rather the parents compromise their opinions to materialism and if they have had the opportunity to encounter spiritual science, deny it. They fail to maintain guardian ship of ethical vision that extends beyond Kindergarten. Even though Waldorf Kindergarten's capture the most sacred and encompassing aspects of the child as she has come from the spiritual world, parents think somehow this arose like a mushroom after the rain. It was adults stupid! It was adults with vision!

But is Cowardly parents who use the excuse that Children are wiser. Children did not make Waldorf Education. Waldorf Education was made by wise Adults for educating our children. Zweig, as most of us here on this list, have met with Steiner's Works and heard in his voice and his answers mature and deep vision that allows us to not only carry our childhood wonder but ripen in vision and wisdom freely.

The sacredness of Childhood and Childhoods wisdom is a wonder to behold, but to delegate the maturity of the generous humanistic and deepened human vision, back onto the backs of our children is a betrayal. They looked and in colleges they look today the world over for any sign of those who still carry the inner torch of real thinking that illuminates the fading light they had as children. The failure to find the language, thinking and illumination of "complex ideas" leads to Columbine or some woman on trial again, again in the U.S. for stoning her children because God told her to do it. Or George Bush, and god told him to invade Iraq and that God was on our side in a Pat Robertson idiocy. Therefore we never argued against nationalistic and patriotic bullshit. We never warned our children that that was not the direction of the future, but take it if it is you way.

Steiner was a wonderful warm and inspiring human being, who could really speak with humor and strength, deep into immense troubling issues. That certaintly partly describes Dr. Steiner and that is certainly what a goodly portion of the Michael School is all about. Given, that I have fully encountered problems in specific Waldorf Schools, with personalities, I understand how one can be burned about it. But, the difference is that before I knew anything of Waldorf, I was stunned that the universe allowed Steiner to get away with all the answers to questions that I had in my own heart. Therefore I met Steiner and knew that the rest had to be as good or better. And many times I have been disappointed.

Have I been disappointed in Waldorf and Antrho's indeed yes. My understanding of Steiner's deed for the 20th century and into the 21st century is as solid as the Foundation Stone it rests upon. The Michael School was offered as a gift to Europe and Europe was too busy descending into the racists doctrines of Peter Staudenmaier to pay attention to the subtle shift. Steiner cracks all Nobel Prize ideals into shattered fragments. I AM research and history rings out from every page. And as Peter has finally agreed. I Am research of that magnitude can have nothing racist about it.

So yes, we in mature insight from having lived through the Sixties in America, have a very clear vision of What Racism is. Children love to point out the differnt skin color, or the red hair, or the freckles of some other child. And the answers from Waldorf Teachers have always been warm, rich, wholesome and humanist, in line with the Rainbow.

However are there reasons behind red hair, freckles, blonds, dark hair, pigments, eye colors and various differences. Those profound studies reveal the depth of how the I AM chose the sulphur or Iron content needed in the blood. But warmth, carrot top cockiness, sulphur and other aspects are profound Star wisdom and Diana only hopes that such things can't be understood. Oh they can. They can be included as either footnotes to the individual, or in the case of RedNecks... you're White and thats all that matters. Yes we understand racism.

Peter should go back to the sixties and see what most of us experienced as we met and marched and rebelled against dogmatic and fifties style prejudice that had locked down the world after those dreadful wars.. What Peter says people would laugh at about Steiner theories, and mock, is exactly why Spiritual Science is so cool.

Because it is transparent who needs to be laughed at. It isn't, wasn't and ain't Dr. Steiner. It is the run with the pack, educational freaks who promote Big Bang idiocy and dialectical materialism or promote George Bush and their sons and daughters to Stone their Children cause god told them to do it.. or as they lie in pieces on Iraqi streets because not enough greatess of soul as yet trickled out into the wide ranges of general cultural thinking.

And in regards to Greens and Ecology, Steiner was right, first and well ahead of everyone and if Peter wants to take an eco stand, Steiner is one of the greatest, with his astonishing Agricultural Course lectures. Nothing compares to them. Here is what we learned about Racism.

"Then it's the blue ones who can't accept
The green ones for living with
The black ones tryin' to be a skinny one
Different strokes for different folks
And so on and so on and scooby dooby dooby

Ooh sha sha
We gotta live together

I am no better and neither are you
We're all the same whatever we do
You love me you hate me
You know me and then
Still can't figure out the scene I'm in
I am everyday people

Then it's the new man
That doesn't like the short man
For being such a rich one
That will not help the poor one
Different strokes for different folks
And so on and so on scooby dooby dooby

Ooh sha sha
We got to live together

There is a yellow one that won't
Accept the black one
That won't accept the red one
That won't accept the white one

Different strokes for different folks
And so on and so on and
Scooby dooby dooby
Ooh sha sha
I am everyday people"

...................................................................................................................................

From: Deborah
Date: Sun Apr 4, 2004 2:03 pm
Subject: Re: more from Zweig

Bradford,

I have a problem with what I perceive to be your interpretation of Zweig's encounter with Rudolf Steiner and the subsequent course of his life. I don't think, from the story we have available, that we can assume that Zweig went astray from his destiny path. He became a brilliant playwright and novelist, knew many of the leading figures of his time and so on. Anthroposophy may not have been his destiny. We can't know.

I've been sharing the Zweig quotes because it gives a fuller picture of the pre World War I European culture than that provided by what's his name (to put it mildly).

[Deborah]

Deborah

A humanist, Zweig lived long enough to see the world he knew utterly destroyed. In despair he and his wife committed suicide near Rio de Janeiro in 1942.

Zweig:

Nevertheless, meeting a man of such a magnetic personality at so early a stage, when he yielded himself to the younger people around him in friendship and without dogmatizing, was an incalculable gain for me. In his fantastic and at the same time profound knowledge I realized that true universality, which we, with the overweening pride of high school boys, thought we had already mastered, was not to be gained by flighty reading and discussion, but only by years of burning endeavor."

[Bradford]

But we also see a very sad, not exactly for me a romantic, ending to the above souls who met Rudolf Steiner and underestimated him.

...................................................................................................................................

From: holderlin66
Date: Sun Apr 4, 2004 11:17 pm
Subject: Retardation and hypocrisy

holderlin wrote:

The failure to find the language, thinking and illumination of "complex ideas" leads to Columbine or some woman on trial again, again in the U.S. for stoning her children because God told her to do it. Or George Bush, and god told him to invade Iraq and that God was on our side in a Pat Robertson idiocy.

Lets add these sound bytes for Fundamentalism to the list of Fraud and deception.

http://mitchcohen.crimsonzine.com/20040403-12255.html

"Whatever the cause, this stance would be laughable, were the stakes not so high. First, the hypocrisy: Bush has quoted directly from Deuteronomy in a speech on the Middle East Crisis, Isaiah in marking the loss of the space shuttle Columbia, and on the first anniversary of September 11th, the president used the Gospel of John to draw a parallel between Christ and the USA.

But Bush reaches extra-Biblically as well. In last year's State of the Union speech, he proclaimed "there's power, wonder working power, in the goodness and idealism and faith of the American people," drawing on a well-known Communion hymn. The phrasing is by no means accidental. That the hymn itself grants that "power, wonder working power" to the Blood of the Lamb, and not the American people, is of little concern to his speechwriter, it seems.

Most troubling to this writer, however, is his extra-extra-Biblical pronouncements, weaving a Biblical, and at times Apocalyptic language into the majority of his speeches and scheduled remarks, whether below the radar or on open display.

He often speaks of America, and by extension himself, in messianic terms. In a conversation with former Palestinian Prime Minister Abbas, Bush claimed God instructed him to strike Saddam. He spoke of a Crusade to defeat the Evildoers. He has cast the fight against terrorism as a battle of Good versus Evil and nothing less. He, of course, leads the forces of Good. On September 14, 2001, he said "our responsibility before history is already clear: to answer these attacks and rid the world of evil." Rid the world of evil?"

Bradford concludes;

Yes we all dislike hypocrisy and it depends on what brand of hypocrisy you are used to. If our Michael School research smells like Satan's farts to you, fundamentalistic generalizations sounds like the dinner bell for Christian cockroaches to me. Millions of them clamor out of the woodwork with nothing in their noxious souls but a hunger for cognition which they totally lack. They mill around and nod their heads as racism, antisemitism and anti-brotherhood that would shame Angels, fills them up like a gas tanker truck fills helium balloons from Rush Limbaugh's talk show.

Fighting hypocrisy is not believing in the Big Bang theory. Fighting hypocrisy is grasping the I AM that appeared on Golgotha as a Master of the Devachan and the atomic table. Fighting hypocrisy is not allowing dialectical materialism to suffocate the soul. Fighting hypocrisy means understanding the astral body, and higher development regions of the soul and spirit. Fighting hypocrisy is looking at the community of creation from Seraphim to Stones and seeing the logical pattern as portrayed in "Outline of Occult Science". Fighting hypocrisy, a good start, is to throw these hypocrites out of office the first chance we get.

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