The Peaceful Warrior

From: golden3000997
Date: Tue Dec 23, 2003 5:15 pm
Subject: Re: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: The Peaceful Warrior

Hi Dottie, Kim, et al,

Since I have been participating in a lot of the dialogue that has been going on this weekend, I'd like to add to what you have just shared, Dottie. Perhaps you were thinking about my "warrior" message to Paulina. I was thinking about it at work today, also and I thought I would like to add that there are many kinds of warriors and many kinds of peacemakers. There are those who must remain away from the battlefield, whether physical or otherwise and be ready to help the fallen and wounded. Think of M*A*S*H* - were those doctors and nurses any less brave or heroic than the soldiers with guns? In some ways, they may have been even braver. Their fight was longer, more drawn out and in a certain sense, more desperate - trying to rescue life in the midst of death.

I don't think that there is ever "one way". I think that ultimately, the final goal of the warrior must be peace. What is the use of fighting unless there is a hope of resolution? of the end of the conflict? And what is the use of the healer if no one ever gets hurt? There is a need on the stage of this world for the hermit and the revolutionary. All have their meaning and place and all interrelate with one another. And all are us! Everyone of us has every potential within him or herself. If we didn't, we wouldn't be human. Each human being has the potential to be a Hitler or a Mother Teresa - not that but one in a few trillion ever swing that far with the pendulum. But the potential is always there. And it is wise to embrace all of the potentials which make us human, because it is the ones that remain unconcious which can trip us up the most. We don't ever know 100% what we will do in any given situation until we are confronted with that situation. Nevertheless, the more conciousness we bring to the potentiality of our lives, the more the likelihood that we will be able to act out of more moral and more noble ethics and objectives. Otherwise, what is the point of stories? of both historical tales and fictional tales? They allow us to "live through" experiences in our minds and souls that we might never encounter as physical reality and they allow us to test our reactions and how we feel and think about those situations. This is a form of "soul exercise" - toning the "muscles" of our concious selves.

I would like to add that I really am a lily-livered coward and wither inside when openly attacked. I am not sure that I would be very good at defending myself. But whenever I "envision" being in a situation where someone else is being attacked, I feel like I would lose all sense of myself and come out with fang and claw. That would probably be the end of me, but I think that I am capable of that kind of rage and fury. Is this good or bad? I don't know. There is both good and bad in this potential. I wouldn't know unless such a thing were to happen, and I'd really prefer not to have it put to the test.

Which is all just to say that in my opinion, we should try to stay flexible in our thinking and try to be as prepared as possible to fight, run or be around to pick up the pieces.

You know, I thought I saw an Elf today on the public transit system!!

Love, Christine

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From: dottie zold
Date: Tue Dec 23, 2003 6:21 pm
Subject: Re: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: The Peaceful Warrior

Christine wrote:
I don't think that there is ever "one way". I think that ultimately, the final goal of the warrior must be peace. What is the use of fighting unless there is a hope of resolution? of the end of the conflict? And what is the use of the healer if no one ever gets hurt? There is a need on the stage of this world for the hermit and the revolutionary.

And

And it is wise to embrace all of the
potentials which make us human, because it is the ones that remain unconcious which can trip us up the most.

Dear Christine,

Not going into personal biographies and so forth I have to say I have felt sincerely within me that I have always fought for the Queen. Always. And, it seems to me that my last fight was in vain in a way: men would do what they wanted to do irregardless of what was neccessary. I usually am alone yet continue to do what is neccessary.

This leads me to who I am today. I have been taking on the Buddha in a sense in the last year or so. What I mean is that I work to be calm souled throughout crisis irregardless who's it is especially mine. To kind of be outside my self. I am preparing my self in a sense not to be shocked by death because I want to be awake in the passage. Where I got that idea I have not a clue but it is what is true for me right now.

So, I read a most beautiful story that allowed me to have a vision of what that looks like: it was a story of a buddist monk who knew his attackes were coming. And the attacker cut off his head thinking he was taking it yet when his spirit rose he laughed at the attacker knowing that he would indeed pay for this atrocity as he had pursued it to the end of the earth.

What I have been contemplating is the idea that my understanding of 'is there evil is there not' question has taken a new turn. And I am a bit perplexed by it as so many other pieces come into play. So, I believe I would make a stand if I felt it warranted for my own behalf but not in a vengence kind of way rather 'no you do not get to take this' and I know I would do that for any other person whom I know or do not. Yet up until a few months ago this was not even a question for my person. I would defend another and would do the best I could for my own person but not kill.

So, the idea that the philospher does not get to be political seems a bit outdated although I understand the intent behind such a thought. Yet we all bring unto Karma its due.

Christine
I would like to add that I really am a lily-livered coward and wither inside when openly attacked.

Dottie

I would have to say I felt the same way about my person up until I joined a website discussing Steiner. And somehow my courage began to build and my thoughts began to jell and I know how to make a stand and hopefully I am learning when to stand down as well.

Christine
You know, I thought I saw an Elf today on the public transit system!!

Dottie

YOU PROBABLY DID:))))) I want to hear about it!

Love,
Dottie

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