Re: the 9th year stuff

 

From: golden3000997
Date: Tue Mar 9, 2004 8:12 pm
Subject: Re: the 9th year stuff

In a message dated 3/9/2004 3:58:38 AM Eastern Standard Time, dandugan writes:

Subj: Re: the 9th year stuff
Date: 3/9/2004 3:58:38 AM Eastern Standard Time
From: Dan Dugan
To: waldorf-critics@topica.com


madpark wrote:

Can someone please explain the 9th year stuff they talk about?

[Childs, Gilbert. Steiner Education: in theory and practice. Edinburgh: Floris Books, 1991, pp. 92-93]

"The undesirability of appealing directly to the intellect of the child before puberty has already been discussed from the spiritual-scientific point of view, but the rationale behind the reluctance to teach the children to read before the age of eight or nine was not specifically dealt with. It may be recalled that, at about the age of nine the child develops or acquires a heightened sense of selfhood; it feels more of an individuality. It feels less sympathetic - in the technical sense - towards its surroundings, it feels less at one with them. Conversely, it feels more antipathetic to its environment, and this it is which helps to induce the enhanced self-consciousness; the child is capable of greater powers of objectification and therefore a sharpened capacity for the intellectual process of apprehending concepts. It would follow, therefore, that it is most appropriate for the child to learn to read at the age of eight or nine, and Steiner frequently reiterated this."

-Dan Dugan

Teaching for the Two Sided Mind
A Guide to Right Brain/ Left Brain Education

By Linda Verlee Williams
1983 Simon & Schuster, NY

Chapter 7
Multisensory Learning

Sensory Learning in the Early Primary Grades

A child's brain is not just smaller or less experienced than an adult's; it is different in a number of ways. The brain develops all through childhood. Auditory perception and discrimination, tactile differentiation, and the ability to transfer information across sense modalities and to interpret that information are not complete until a child is at least eight years old. Development of visual perception continues into adolescence. (1) Therefore, in considering the role of the senses in learning, we must be concerned not only with how they can help children learn skills and information, but also with how development affects a child's ability to perform specific tasks and with the impact of classroom activities on sensory development and integration.

Just as the brain develops in an orderly manner, thinking progresses in a predictable sequence with verbal ability appearing relatively late in the process. A task must be appropriate to a child's level of development if the child is to succeed at it and grow from the experience. When we force children to learn to read and to work with verbal materials before they are developmentally ready, we are like a builder who, eager to see results, fails to put in the foundation before beginning to work on the house.

(1.) Raymond S. More, Dorothy N. More, et al. School Can Wait (Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University Press, 1979) p. 153

Posted by Christine
March 9, 2004

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From: Dan Dugan
Date: Tue Mar 9, 2004 10:57 pm
Subject: Re: the 9th year stuff

Christine Natale, you quoted this in response to a question about "the nine year change."

Teaching for the Two Sided Mind
A Guide to Right Brain/ Left Brain Education

By Linda Verlee Williams
1983 Simon & Schuster, NY

Chapter 7
Multisensory Learning

Sensory Learning in the Early Primary Grades

A child's brain is not just smaller or less experienced than an adult's; it is different in a number of ways. The brain develops all through childhood. Auditory perception and discrimination, tactile differentiation, and the ability to transfer information across sense modalities and to interpret that information are not complete until a child is at least eight years old. Development of visual perception continues into adolescence. (1) Therefore, in considering the role of the senses in learning, we must be concerned not only with how they can help children learn skills and information, but also with how development affects a child's ability to perform specific tasks and with the impact of classroom activities on sensory development and integration.

Just as the brain develops in an orderly manner, thinking progresses in a predictable sequence with verbal ability appearing relatively late in the process. A task must be appropriate to a child's level of development if the child is to succeed at it and grow from the experience. When we force children to learn to read and to work with verbal materials before they are developmentally ready, we are like a builder who, eager to see results, fails to put in the foundation before beginning to work on the house.

But Williams doesn't say anything about "the nine year change" or anything like it. In Waldorf it's considered to be a very significant milestone in development:

"The 'nine-year change' marks a childhood transformation no less profound than puberty and adolescence. The curriculum for grades 3 and 4 provides the child with a powerful reflection of this transformation... [Sunbridge College Summer '98 Summer Program announcement, William Ward "Teaching Grades 3 & 4"]

-Dan Dugan

...................................................................................................................................

From: at
Date: Wed Mar 10, 2004 4:13 pm
Subject: Re: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: the 9th year stuff

So? Just because no one has named it does not mean that it does not exist.

Can you perhaps describe what you understand the Nine-year change to be, so that I can be clear about what you don't think exists?

Thanks.

Daniel Hindes

PS You also seem to have missed the point of Christine's post. Perhaps she should have been more explicit.

----- Original Message -----
From: Dan Dugan
To: <waldorf-critics@topica.com>; <anthroposophy_tomorrow@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, March 10, 2004 1:57 AM
Subject: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: the 9th year stuff

Christine Natale, you quoted this in response to a question about "the nine year change."

Teaching for the Two Sided Mind
A Guide to Right Brain/ Left Brain Education

By Linda Verlee Williams
1983 Simon & Schuster, NY

Chapter 7
Multisensory Learning

Sensory Learning in the Early Primary Grades

A child's brain is not just smaller or less experienced than an adult's; it is different in a number of ways. The brain develops all through childhood. Auditory perception and discrimination, tactile differentiation, and the ability to transfer information across sense modalities and to interpret that information are not complete until a child is at least eight years old. Development of visual perception continues into adolescence. (1) Therefore, in considering the role of the senses in learning, we must be concerned not only with how they can help children learn skills and information, but also with how development affects a child's ability to perform specific tasks and with the impact of classroom activities on sensory development and integration.

Just as the brain develops in an orderly manner, thinking progresses in a predictable sequence with verbal ability appearing relatively late in the process. A task must be appropriate to a child's level of development if the child is to succeed at it and grow from the experience. When we force children to learn to read and to work with verbal materials before they are developmentally ready, we are like a builder who, eager to see results, fails to put in the foundation before beginning to work on the house.

But Williams doesn't say anything about "the nine year change" or anything like it. In Waldorf it's considered to be a very significant milestone in development:

"The 'nine-year change' marks a childhood transformation no less profound than puberty and adolescence. The curriculum for grades 3 and 4 provides the child with a powerful reflection of this transformation... [Sunbridge College Summer '98 Summer Program announcement, William Ward "Teaching Grades 3 & 4"]

-Dan Dugan

...................................................................................................................................

From: golden3000997
Date: Wed Mar 10, 2004 5:12 pm
Subject: Re: [anthroposophy_tomorrow] Re: the 9th year stuff

In a message dated 3/10/2004 7:45:29 PM Eastern Standard Time, at writes:

Auditory perception and discrimination, tactile differentiation, and the ability to transfer information across sense modalities and to interpret that information are not complete until a child is at least eight years old.

I can't do better than that if people can't read English!

Christine

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